Tag Archives: WWII

The Passing of Dad


Dad was born nearly a century ago.

It’s amazing when you think of it that way.

February 25, 1919 in Seattle, WA to be exact.  Over 99 years ago.

The fifth of seven siblings born to Hisakichi and Kono Kanemoto, both legal immigrants from Hiroshima.

…but Dad passed away quietly at 99 years of age on Good Friday, March 30, 2018 in Los Angeles, CA – at the same facility where his older sister, my Aunt Shizue, passed away just a few years earlier at 95.

Just an eulogy in photographs of Dad:

1920a
Dad on left, somewhere in Seattle with his father Hisakichi and older sister Shizue. Circa 1920.
1920
Circa1921, King and Maynard Streets, Seattle, WA
Dad at right with Grandpa Hisakichi and Aunt Shiz near their barbershop on King and Maynard, Seattle, WA. Circa 1922.

 

1923
Dad at far right. Grandfather holding Suetaro with Shiz holding a precious doll. Circa 1923, Seattle, WA.

 

1924
Dad second from left holding what appears to be a rice ball in front of their Seattle barbershop. Far left is Suetaro; to his right is Aunt Shiz. Circa 1924.

 

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From left clockwise: Grandmother Kono, Suetaro climbing on chair, Dad with cap, Shiz, Mrs. Fujii and her son (?) and the youngest Kanemoto, baby Mieko who would pass away at 15 years of age in Hiroshima.  Circa 1925, corner of Maynard and King Streets, Seattle, WA.

 

1927a
My guess is circa 1925; the youngest sister Mieko appears to be about two years old. Dad on left, Uncle Suetaro is the boy in the center (KIA as a sergeant of the Japanese Imperial Army on Leyte October 1944). By 1927, all but the oldest boy (Uncle Yutaka seated on the left) would be living in Hiroshima. Only two would return to the United States before the outbreak of war. Of those left in Japan, only my Grandma will be alive by war’s end.
This was taken in Seattle. The finish was heavily soiled by oils left by those who handled it decades earlier and could not be smoothly removed.

 

1928a
This is the first and oldest known photograph taken of my father’s Hiroshima home, still owned today by the Kanemoto family, circa 1928. Dad is the third from the left. The photo includes all of my dad’s siblings except for his oldest brother who had returned to Seattle and another brother who died at two years of age in Seattle.
The house was damaged by the atomic blast.

 

Dad on right next to his favorite brother, Suetaro. It is a tiny picture, about the size of a quarter, and it fell out from behind a larger picture glued in place in Granmother Kono’s photo album. Taken in front of family home in Hiroshima. My guess is 1928.

 

Dad is second from left, fourth row back in a lighter uniform, in a class photo at his Hiroshima high school, Nichu. It was totally destroyed by the atomic bomb. Sadly, the odds are tremendous all of his classmates were killed or wounded in the war as was his brother.  Up to a few years ago, he still remembered perhaps six of his classmates pictured. Dad was the last to pass away. Likely 1936.

 

I think of all the pictures of Dad spanning 99 years, this is the happiest I’ve seen him (right), posing at his Hiroshima home with his two younger siblings. Both siblings would pass away before the end of WWII. Circa 1936 is a guess.

 

Dad on his high school track team. He was a track star! Dad is in first row center, in white cap.

 

A page out of his Hiroshima high school’s yearbook: Dad in his senior high school portrait, bottom right. As verified by his predecessor high school administrative staff, he was the last one still living as of three years ago. He would return to Seattle after this. 1937.

 

Dad showing off his pride in his varsity sweater in front of his brother Yutaka’s home on Fir St. in Seattle. Likely taken between 1937 and Pearl Harbor.

 

Dad (standing) with his sister-in-law and my Aunt Haru and his oldest brother Yutaka holding his first son Seiichi Robert. Robert would die at six years of age at the Minidoka prison camp in 1944. All would be imprisoned three years later by President FDR, a Democrat. Taken in Seattle 1938.

 

Dad’s draft card that classified him as an Enemy Alien (4c). Ironically, he had to carry it around in his wallet at all times while imprisoned at the Tule Lake and Minidoka prison camps – therefore the crease. 1943.

 

Dad preparing to ship out to Japan with the rest of his US 8th Army Military Intelligence Service buddies. He was one of the first graduates of the now US Army’s Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center. Presidio of Monterey, November 1947.

 

Dad somewhere in Occupied Japan, March 1948.

 

Dad on his fateful day. Poor guy. I never heard him talk back to mom… ever. Tokyo February 1951.

 

When Dad (at right) took mom to meet his Hiroshima relatives – including my Grandma (circa 1951). I can sense the tension between aristocrat Mom and coubtry woman Grandma Kono! LOL His mom would pass away in 1954, his oldest sister Michie (center) in 1963. All were survivors of the atomic bomb.

 

Likely taken soon after their wedding in 1951. Dad, mom, Aunt Eiko, Grandma and Grandpa. Notice the heavy metal 16mm Bell & Howell movie projector. I remember using it in Los Angeles as a kid. Tokyo.

 

Dad of left with mom and Grandpa.  I’m the kid.  May 1956 – Tamagawa Park, Tokyo.

 

Dad with mom and me. Dad will decide to leave for America for good the next year. April 7, 1957 – Enoshima Beach, Tokyo

 

Dad watching over me trying to ride my first bike, a Sears Outlet J.C. Higgins. His beat up 1955 Ford Victoria Custom’s fender can be seen at left. Taken at home on Oakford Drive in East Los Angeles. Circa 1962

 

Dad in yellow sweater with some of mom’s Nisei friends. My guess is circa 1969. My guess also is that they have all passed away. East Los Angeles.

 

Dad still wearing that yellow sweater! His first new car (now eight years old in the picture) – a 1963 Mercury Meteor Custom – behind us at LAX, picking up Aunt Eiko and Uncle Paul (also a US 8th Army MIS veteran) who flew in from Tokyo. May 1971.

 

Dad with his older brother Yutaka and oldeer sister Shizue. Best guess is 1985, location unknown.

 

Dad (R) returned to Hiroshima for a vacation in 1997; Masako is in the center. This was taken at his family home. Notice the stepping stone; it is the same one Masako stood next to in a picture taken in 1948. Sadly, this would be his last time in his beloved Hiroshima.

 

Dad actually “died” on his birthday in 2010 when he slumped over just before eating lunch. My oldest daughter Robyn (back to camera) saved the day by jumping in then shaking him until his heart started beating again. What was funny was after starting to breathe again after about a minute, he had no idea anything happened. Paramedics tend to him. Irvine, 2010.

 

Dad in 2012 deciphering the names written on a captured Japanese battle flag from WWII. Some of the people who came across my WWII blogs contacted me about such souvenirs their grandfather’s brought back from the Pacific; they were hopeful Dad would be able to read the key names and village from where the deceased Japanese soldier came from in their attempts to return the flags.  I thought it good for him, just to keep his mind active.  Truthfully, there aren’t many left who can read these old characters.  Not even my mom or aunt could read them. Dad reads them like he was 18 years old.

 

 

This will be the last time Dad and his older sister Aunt Shizue would see each other. She would pass away quietly a short time later at the age of 95. Dad would pass away at the same facility.

 

A cell phone portrait of Dad several years ago at his assisted living facility. After eating, the dining room servers would tell me Dad would sometimes come back a short time later, sit down, and begin to order breakfast again.  The server would say, “Koso, you just ate!” and he would say, “”Oh, yeah?  Pumpkin head.”

 

Dad in center at my oldest daughter’s wedding, January 2013. Photo courtesy of Toyo Miyatake Studios.

 

Although 96 years of age, Dad meets his only great-grandchild Emi. I think everyone was scared he was going to drop her. 2014.

 

My last picture of Dad, flanked by my two youngest kids, taken on his 99th birthday last month. Yes, he is smiling because he got to eat his favorite sweet, “Odango”. February 2018, Los Angeles.

 

And my last video of Dad:

Dad, I wish I were a much better son…  but I know you are joyfully back playing “oninga” or jump-frog in front of your Hiroshima home with your favorite brother Suetaro.  I hope you have all the odango you can eat now.  You will be forever young.

Combat! – Part 3


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While my screenshot is of poor quality, both Hanley and Saunders are in their standard issue steel helmets and while obscured, both are carrying M-1 Garand rifles in this first episode.

The Weapons, Equipment and Explosions

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A publicity still of Sgt. Saunders from Episode 1, “A Day in June”, holding a Garand M-1.

People who watched Combat! from the get-go pretty much think of Sgt. Saunders in their mind when they see a Tommy gun and Lt. Hanley when they see a M-1  carbine, yes?  The power of media herewith.

But the truth of the matter is both Saunders and Hanley started out with the 30.06 firing M-1 Garand rifle as they hit the beach at Omaha Beach on D-Day in the first episode which began shooting on June 2, 1962.

And they both had standard issue steel helmets.

Sgt. Saunders, His Thompson Machine Gun and Camo Helmet

As proof Sgt. Saunders “went over the side” with a M-1 Garand in Episode 1’s D-Day, here he is trying to board his landing craft #PA-142 (The landing craft PA-142 does show up in real D-Day footage.) with it slung over his shoulder.  He also has on a standard issue two-piece steel helmet:

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My screenshot of Saunders “going over the side” on D-Day in Episode 1, complete with his 30.06 firing M-1 Garand and standard issue helmet.

He carries this weapon throughout the first episode…but never fires a shot.

In Episode 2, no one fires a shot.

However, his Thompson and his distinctive camo helmet shows up ever so quietly and out of sequence series-wise in Episode 3 below:

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Saunder’s Thompson’s muzzle is the first to make its appearance as he nudges the door open with it, followed by his trademark camo helmet.

However, before he fires a shot, he is captured by the Nazis.  He loses his Thompson and camo helmet as he is taken prisoner.

I say it was out of sequence as in Episode 4, Sgt. Saunders reverts back to his standard issue helmet but is also unusually equipped with a M-1 carbine.  This also is Lt. Hanley’s first episode with his trademark M-1 carbine.  However, Sgt. Saunders never fires a shot nor does Lt. Hanley.

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My screenshot of Sgt. Saunders holding a M-1 carbine in Episode 4. He still hasn’t fired a shot on this TV series.

So when does Saunders get to shoot?  Read on…

In Episode 5, Saunders’ trademark camo helmet makes its permanent re-appearance for the rest of the show.  But how did he become the one and only to wear such a distinctive helmet?

Because to make my mom feel more overcome with his macho? Nope… It was because he… complained!  Sorry to blow another iconic image you may have had of your childhood idol.  According to statements made by Morrow and others per various websites and interviews, Morrow had begun to complain that the weight of the standard issue steel helmet was compressing his vertebrae on those week long shoots.  Therefore, it was replaced with a custom made, lighter fiberglass one, designed by the award winning prop crew.  The helmet’s camo covering – which is bona fide US Army paratrooper parachute material that was used in Europe – became necessary to hide the fact the helmet was fiberglass.

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Actual combat photo of US Army paratroopers with camo covers on helment. At their feet is a dead German.

The US Army paratrooper camo patterns, colors and construction differed from the Marine versions (sometimes nicknamed “frogskin”) for which it has frequently been mistaken.

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The iconic WWII photo of a US Marine on Saipan. Notice his camo cover and a M-1 slung over his shoulder sans bayonet mount.

In a comment made by one of the directors, he jokingly said the oddball helmet covering made it easier for the cameramen to follow him.  One other bit of trivia on his helmet: one drawback was that it was so light, it would fall off when he would “hit the dirt” or bump it against an object.

_______________________________

The Tommy Gun

Like any other American boy, I wanted a Tommy gun so bad so that I could pretend to be like Sgt. Saunders.  Many other boys wanted it, too!  But alas, dad couldn’t afford one.

But I did get a cap gun, holster and cowboy hat when I was about four, believing they belonged to Roy Rogers:

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Me. Ever see a cowboy wearing flip-flops?

As for his Thompson, which fired .45 caliber rounds, here is a real one in full auto in case you’re new to this:

But back to the TV Thompson and I won’t go into discussions of what model it was because there were apparently several in use… including a wooden one.

Yes, a wooden one.  Sorry to burst your bubble once again, guys.

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After Morrow lugged a real one around for a couple of weeks, he realized why Jason turned it down.  For argument’s sake, a real one weighed roughly about 10-1/2 pounds empty.  Can you imagine what a real soldier or Marine thought when he would lug it around while actually getting shot at and likely suffering from dysentery?  The prop men therefore fashioned one out of wood for Morrow.

Saunders would carry the wooden mock up when walking or running during a shoot.  Weapons experts can spot it a mile away.  He would then switch to the real Thompson for a firefight.

However, the set version of Saunders’ “real” Tommy gun was not without problems as it was modified to shoot blanks.  According to various sources, the barrel was choked down¹ for set use.  The weapons guys thought by choking it down, the spent cartridges would eject better.  However, they were wrong.  For you Combat! buffs, do you recollect Saunders firing the Thompson in long bursts?  I don’t think you will.  Saunders only fires it in 2-3-4 round bursts as it would jam up³.  He had a nickname for it: Jammomatic.  In some firefight scenes, you can see Saunders trying to unjam it.  Cut!

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The “real” Thompson. Source unknown.

So…to answer the question when Sgt. Saunders finally get to shoot anything?²  Indeed, it was his trademark Thompson in Episode 5.  He and Hanley locate a sniper while under fire and he lets lose two single shots.  Not a spray, mind you.  Hanley also fires his M-1 carbine for the first time as well.

Lastly, many collectors years ago were seeking to find this Thompson that Sgt. Saunders made famous.  While some stories vary, the most common answer is that the several Thompson’s that were used in the series were rented from Stembridge Rentals, a common source for Hollywood at that time.  As a result, this famous prop is likely lost for all time.

Rick Jason and His M-1 Carbine

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Publicity still of Lt. Hanley. Just my opinion but I’ve not seen a bayonet stud (shown here) on a WWII era M-1 carbine.

As mentioned, the Thompson was originally meant for Lt. Hanley.  When they first handed him the Thompson, he said no way.  “Get me something lighter,” he said.  You see, he knew about guns being a hunter; he even did his own reloads.  And that’s how Saunders eventually got the Thompson – it was basically a hand-me down.

His M-1 carbine was also choked down for use with blanks.  However, with him being the only one of the regulars being an avid shooter, he looked the most natural shouldering a weapon.  He once wrote that the real M-1 carbine’s round wouldn’t kill a “sick mouse”, implying it had no stopping power.  However, during the Battle for Okinawa in 1945, websites report that 75% of the Japanese casualties were inflicted by M-1 carbine rounds.

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None of the M-1 carbines in this US Marine Corps photo show a bayonet stud as seen on Hanley’s M-1 carbine but their style of helmet camouflage material can be clearly seen.

For those of you who have not seen one of these fire, here is a video.  As there is a bayonet stud, it may not be true WWII vintage but the message is clear.  It can take down a sick mouse with ease.  While watching this, imagine you are 18 years old on a hostile battlefield:

So what happened to Lt. Hanley’s actual M-1 carbine?

According to a letter he wrote, Rick Jason stated that against the studio’s direction, he simply took it home.  While it was registered to the Culver City Police Department, he told the prop man that after lugging it around on the sets for five years, it was his.  Period.  So he stole it… I mean, took it home on a permanent basis.

After taking it home, he wrote he poured lead into the barrel to ensure it cannot be loaded and then accidentally fired.  He then left it in his cabinet for about four years.

Shortly thereafter, the well known comedian Charlie Callas stopped by Jason’s home and quickly spotted the M-1.  Being a gun collector, Callas immediately figured out it was the one Jason had made famous on Combat!  After a few libations around the pool, Jason gave it to Callas as it was “taking up space where a nice rifle could occupy”.  Before Jason passed away, he indicated that Callas still had it in his collection.  However, Callas passed away in 2011; I haven’t come across any mention of “Lt. Hanley’s M-1” since then.

Kabooms and Bullet Holes

By all accounts, Combat! was blessed with an excellent special effects team, headed up by A. D. Flowers.  Flowers would eventually win an Oscar for his work on Tora! Tora! Tora! years later.

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While many “explosions” in movies today are computer generated, the explosions and bullet impacts on walls and such filmed on “Combat!” were actual controlled explosions.  Vic Morrow always said that the actors felt very secure and safe in spite of all the explosive commotion due to Flowers’ exacting expertise.

While far from an actual barrage (I cannot imagine the horror of being at the receiving end of real ones.), the special effects team and cameramen did a spectacular job simulating them for TV.  Here’s an example:

To accomplish this, the special effects team would actually exactingly dig holes, plant the explosives called “pots”, then run wires.  When you hit the switch, the explosives would go off.  These pots – made out of iron at that time – would be narrow at the bottom and wide at the top.  This “shaped” the “explosion” up, protecting the actor.  A portion of the pot would extend above the ground then was covered by peat moss which could not be made out in the movie footage.  Actors had very specific routes to run but safety was the rule.

I cannot be certain but for the above footage, Flowers said in an interview that 20 special effects guys were used at a cost of $25,000 for two days and 300,000 feet of electrical wire was run.  He also said that in a three month time, they blew up 1,500 bags worth of peat moss.

Amazing talent, I say.

“Squibs” were used to mimic bullet impacts (above).  For wood, they actually drilled a hole into the wood for every scripted bullet hit then inserted a small charge connected by wire to a control switch.  Extra care had to exercised to ensure the safety of the actors and crew as at times, the charge would be stuffed with balsa wood pieces and powder.  In the same three month period mentioned directly above, 15,000 bullet hits were used.  Incredible.  Dust pellets fired by air guns were used to mimic bullet hits on masonry.

What happened to the regulars, final bits of trivia and a conclusion in Part 4.

Part 1 is here.

Part 2 is here.

Part 4 is here.

NOTES:

  1. A choked barrel is one in which there’s a reduction in the diameter of the bore near the muzzle.
  2. In an episode a short time later, he is re-united with a soldier he fought alongside with him on D-Day.  In this episode, the studio inserted other footage they had taken for the first episode but had not used.  In this sequence, Saunders does fire his M-1 Garand on the beach.
  3. In actual combat, the Thompson was usually fired in short bursts to help improve accuracy as well due to something called “creep”, encountered when firing long bursts.  The recoil would cause the barrel to creep up and to the right if you were right-handed.

Combat! – Part 2


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A Quick Review

Combat! ran for five strong seasons, a total of 152 episodes, all of  which  aired on Tuesday nights from 7:30 pm to 8:30 pm on ABC.  Each episode ran for a maximum of 52 minutes and ran against shows like “Gunsmoke” or the “Red Skelton Show”.  The first four seasons were in B&W with the fifth and final season in color (1967).  Perhaps there is one prominent reason for this show’s continued success at that time.  Vic Morrow had been heard to proudly boast that the story lines are not about men AT war, but about men IN war.  I tend to agree.

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Filmed at the famed MGM backlot.

When you think about WWII historically, the Germans surrendered to the Allied Forces just 11 months after D-Day; yet, this series ran for five years.  Sure was a long war.  According to various trivia sources, Saunders was wounded 40 times, Kirby 37 times and Hanley 36 times.  (Audie Murphy, America’s most decorated military man, was officially wounded three times, the last time the day before he was bestowed the Medal of Honor.).

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My screenshot of a tired squad trudging through mud, coming in for a short rest. Filmed at a winery in Cucamonga, CA.

Filming and Locations

Filming was arduous.  They shot six full days – 14 hours a day – for a week’s one hour episode.  When they were shooting outside, cloud cover may have come in after they started shooting a scene in sunlight, necessitating a re-shoot from the beginning.  There was a “no shave” rule in effect once shooting started.  Once in awhile, even though the “combat” action for a TV episode was over in a day, it took a week to film.  The beard growth was noticeable, especially on Caje.  In the initial season, the actors reminisced that for some time, they didn’t even have chairs to sit on in between takes.  Vic Morrow put an end to that by “striking” until chairs were provided.

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Saunders, Caje and Kirby at left in culvert. Taken at Franklin Canyon. Source unknown.

While filming for a couple of episodes took place in Loire, France, most were shot on location at the famous MGM Hollywood’s historic backlots or out in southern California’s less traveled areas like Cucamonga or Thousand Oaks (now pretty much Westlake Village and covered with condos).  In addition, a lot of filming over all five seasons took place in Franklin Canyon, smack dab in in the hills between Sunset Blvd. in Hollywood and Ventura Blvd. in Studio City.  Today, it is still accessible by the public but some of it is now a nature preserve.  As a bit of trivia, it is rumored you can still find spent cartridges from some of the firefights.  Many of the landmarks seen in the episodes also remain, like the reservoirs and waterways, culverts, prominent trees and a short overpass.

One interesting thing in some of the overview shots taken of the SoCal terrain was that you could clearly see the haze due to the heavy smog of that time.  In addition, if your hearing is good and you know which scenes to watch, you can hear the sound of jets roaring overhead.  The Nazis were far advanced in their jet technology, you know. 🙂

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Hanley, Saunders and Little John overrunning a destroyed German machine gun nest. Due to the background terrain, my guess is this was shot somewhere in Thousand Oaks (now Westlake Village). Source unknown.

One other location was in snow covered Squaw Valley for a couple of rare winter episodes, one starring Mickey Rooney in “Silver Service”.  It was possibly produced to reflect on the costly Battle of the Bulge although the Combat! episodes never made it out of France.  There was so much footage taken over five tough days that they were used for a couple of episodes.  In the other winter setting episode which utilized the Squaw Valley footage (“Mountain Man”), Caje (Pierre Jalbert) shows off his Olympic skill by skiing down the mountain to escape from Nazis (below).  In true life, he broke his leg as a teen just before the Olympics, ending his chance to ski for Canada.  It is reported he had a very good chance for a medal.

By the way, the “Nazi” chasing Caje down the hill was Bob Beattie, the coach for the US Olympic ski team at that time.

In a funny moment and during the planning stages to show off his skiing abilities, Pierre quipped, “There are no mountains in Normandy, pal.”

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Innovative Movie Camera Work

Much of the true combat footage taken during WWII by the Marines were with smaller movie cameras being hand-held under fire by brave Marine camera men; many were killed.  It is reported the production crew had wanted to portray the lives of the soldier while in combat and to honor these WWII cameramen by imitating the camera “unsteadiness” being hand-held…with nervous courage.

In this pursuit, the technical achievement by the film crews of Combat! was the innovation and perfection of hand-held cinematography with movie film.  Such mastery was incredible for an art form that just started a few short years earlier. They perfected the usage of an Arriflex-35BL movie camera being hand held by a camera man following the action on foot, yielding the “shaky” look.  While the camera is mounted on a very large cinematography tripod head here, the camera and film were similar to this:

In essence, this was the beginning of the “Hero” video camera so commonly in use today 50 years later by people like yourselves.    In the end, the footage for Combat! honored these brave camera WWII men and added to the realism to the TV screen with their up close and “shaky” look.

One incredibly imaginative bit of hand-held footage was in “Hills Are For Heroes”, a two-part story and masterpiece directed by Vic Morrow himself.  In a critical “death scene”, instead of simply filming a key actor crumpling onto the dirt battlefield, they tried something unheard of in the early 1960’s: they secured a 35mm Arriflex hand-held movie camera to the cameraman’s head.  These cameras were not the light, compact digital ones we use today; these were bulky, heavy and had 35mm film spools as well.  They used something like a huge, thick rubber band and secured the Arriflex to the cameraman’s head.  Then, he stood where actor was shot, fell to the ground while looking through the eye piece then rolling down the hill, filming all the time.  At the end of the sequence, the now “dead” soldier (cameraman) continued to film and perfectly captured the coming of his now distraught buddy trying to come to his aid.  Incidentally, the cameraman got a cut over his eye for his efforts.

The innovative footage can be seen here, a clip from “Hills Are For Heroes”.  It was artistically done in slo-mo:

The Guest Stars

As ABC was really struggling at this time, Combat! was a shot in their arm being in the “Top Ten” shows.  Due to its popularity, movie and TV stars of the day clamored to get a part in Combat!  According to an interview of Pierre Jalbert (Caje) after the show went off the air, he said, “Who wouldn’t want to play soldier for the week?”  Some were least expected; some noted folks had cameos like Warren Spahn, the Cy Young Award winning pitcher (below).  He played a non-speaking role as a German soldier in Season 2, Episode 8.  By the way, he was a decorated WWII soldier having earned a Purple Heart.  He loved the show and was a fan.

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Warren Spahn on the set of “Combat!” AP photo.

Indeed, the list of famous guest stars was long.  Some guest starred more than once.  They included:

  1. Robert Duvall
  2. Leonard Nimoy (His role was as a translator in both episodes.)
  3. Eddie Albert
  4. James Whitmore (Played a Nazi officer while killing three GI’s, disguised as a Catholic father.)
  5. James Coburn
  6. Charles Bronson (He played a demolition expert confronted with either not doing his duty or blowing up priceless marble statues and artwork.)
  7. Sal Mineo
  8. Lee Marvin
  9. Neville Brand (I understand he was awarded the Silver Star, a Purple Heart and the Combat Infantry Badge in Europe during WWII.)
  10. Ted Knight
  11. Frankie Avalon
  12. Mickey Rooney
  13. Roddy McDowell
  14. Tom Skeritt
  15. Fernando Lamas
  16. Dennis Weaver

…and the list goes on.  Not to be a spoiler, but some of these famous guest stars are “killed” in their episodes.

Some screenshots of the stars:

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Leonard Nimoy appeared in two episodes. In both, he served as a translator for Saunders.
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Sal Mineo, also guest starred twice. Appears to be a publicity still.
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Frankie Avalon and “Caje” off camera in a publicity still.
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Lee Marvin and “Saunders”. Source unknown.
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Telly Savalas and “Hanley”, where Savalas plays a Greek officer. Source unknown.
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Charles Bronson.  He portrayed an explosives expert torn between doing his job or saving priceless marble statues being safeguarded by a convent.  Source unknown.
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My screenshot of Eddie Albert wearing his WWI Doughboy uniform thinking he captured a Nazi (Saunders). It was an attempt to educate the viewers on what may happen to a man who was in combat (PTSD).
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Mickey Rooney in the episode “Silver Service”. One thing he tries to portray is the pain of frostbite, endured by many on the front during the frigid winter. The lady is another star, Claudine Longet.
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James Coburn filming at the MGM backlot. He played a Nazi “infiltrator” in this episode.
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As a rare female guest star, Antoinette Bower portrays a young French girl driven mad by war. Source unknown.

According to a story by Dick Peabody (Little John), he mentioned that some of these stars were there just for the money and exposure while a few were there to enjoy the work and “become one of the gang”.  One of the best, he said, was Fernando Lamas.  He would bring along his beautiful and famous wife, Esther Williams, and they would “recuperate” together from the day’s shooting in their trailer which he brought along.  He said Esther Williams was the ultimate host, providing fine wine and appetizers for the regulars in attendance.  He also mentioned Robert Duvall and Dennis Weaver detached themselves from the regulars and weren’t much fun at all.  Unbelievably, Duvall guest starred in three episodes.

Fascinating trivia about the weapons, episodes and what happened to the regulars in real life come in Part 3.

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Part 1 can be found here.

Part 3 can be found here.

Part 4 and Conclusion can be found here.

 

Combat! – Part 1


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Back in the very early 1960’s, my dad picked up a used B&W TV set from an appliance store’s outdoor parking lot sale at Atlantic Square in Monterey Park, CA.  It was loaded into the cavernous trunk of his 1955 Ford Victoria coupe, also bought (really) used.  He probably should have spent the money on repairing the car instead of buying that TV.  Anyways, the TV was our first one, dust covered vacuum tubes and all.  At least it turned on.

Well, mom commandeered it.  Don’t ask me why.  After all, she didn’t speak much English at all having come here just a few years earlier.

While I was able to watch The Mouseketeers, Sheriff John and Engineer Bill in the morning, the night belonged to mom.  She decided what to watch.  I don’t recall dad ever saying anything either, but then, he never did.  (ps Sheriff John read off my name during his show on my birthday.  He even pronounced it correctly.)

I remember some of “her” shows.

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“Sea Hunt”.  She loved seeing Lloyd Bridges in his swimming trunks.  (He did enlist in the Coast Guard when WWII started.)

“Rawhide”.

“The Ed Sullivan Show”.

“Have Gun – Will Travel”.

“The Lucy Show”… although I can’t figure out for the life of me how she could have laughed at the lines.  She couldn’t have possibly understood the English.  American humor is so different from that of Japan’s, too.  I guess she just laughed at her physical comedy and wacky faces.  (Another ps: I watched re-runs of the Lucy Show when I stayed in Japan for two years as a young adult.  You will be shocked to learn the lines were radically changed and replaced with dubbed Japanese which would be funny in their culture.)

Near the top of her list was the “Dean Martin Show”.  Of course, it was because of Dean Martin.  While he didn’t get into swimming trunks like Lloyd Bridges, man, she thought he was man’s equivalent of Marilyn Monroe.

But sadly for dad, the show at the top of mom’s list was…  Wait for it…  Combat!

“Combat!”?  How could that be?  How could she possibly want to watch a TV series based on a war Japan just brutally lost 15 short years earlier?  Her city of Tokyo was burned to the ground in 1945 by us Americans and she was hungry all the time.   Even grandma used to call the men of the US military occupying Japan as the “invaders” or “long legs”.  Dad, a Japanese-American, was one of the invaders but definitely sans the long legs.

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Dad on the left in his summer US 8th Army uniform with two of my cousins in Hiroshima (1948). By the way, dad had one more stripe than Sgt. Saunders.

Did she know what “Little John, take the point” or “Kirby, set up your BAR over there to provide cover” meant?  Of course not.

Well, if you haven’t guessed yet as to why she loved to watch Combat!…  it was because of…  Sgt. Saunders.

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Sgt. “Chip” Saunders.  He was played by Vic Morrow.  He outdid Dean Martin and Lloyd Bridges – and my dad – by far in her epitome of manliness department.  Hell, she couldn’t even pronounce his TV name correctly: SAN-DAZU is how she pronounced it with her Japanese pronunciation.  All she saw was testosterone.  Machismo.

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Sgt. Chip Saunders. Source unknown.

Even though I was young, I vaguely remember I felt kind of odd towards dad as every time we got together with her “Nisei” lady friends, mom would rant and rave of Saunders – all in Japanese – with dad next to her.  “Daddy kara chigatte San-dazu-san wa otokopokutte kakko ii!” or translated, “Unlike dad, Saunders is so manly, rugged and handsome.  He’s a man!”  I also recall her scolding at dad every now and then in the house or car to be more “manly”.

Poor dad.

Of course, there was co-star Lt. Gil Hanley, played by Rick Jason.  She noticed him too, of course, but all she felt about him was that he was “cute” like a teen movie star – not a man’s man.

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Lieutenant Hanley on Combat!, played by Rick Jason.  Source unknown.

The other regulars were:

Pvt. William G. Kirby, who started the series with a M-1 Garand but eventually got his wish to man the BAR.  He was well played by Jack Hogan and was always getting yelled at for doing something lame-brain:

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Talkative and excitable PFC Kirby, manning his BAR, was played by Jack Hogan. Source unknown.

PFC Paul “Caje” LeMay was Saunders go-to man on patrol or in a firefight; he was played by Pierre Jalbert.  In the series, he is of Cajun heritage and comes from New Orleans where he spoke French fluently.  In real life, he was a Canadian skiing champ in his teens and was destined to ski in the Olympics.

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PFC Paul “Caje” LeMay. Source unknown.

“Little John” rounded out the long playing cast members.  His TV name was a gag; he towered over everyone else being 6′ 6″ tall.  I don’t know if it was custom made but his standard issue GI helmet fit like a condom as it looked like a tiny beanie on his head.  His real name was Dick Peabody and he wrote a column later in life which I’ll mention later.  He often wrote about the “great times” they had while shooting the episodes.

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“Little John” at left, played by Dick Peabody. To his immediate right are Caje and Kirby.

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The show was unique, even for today.  It did its best to convey the war from the GI Joe’s point of view.  Sure, the “kills” on the set were theatrical nor were the on-set explosions or artillery barrages real but it had a human streak throughout its run on TV.  It tried to convey what war was really like for the suffering civilians or the everyday soldier – well, as best it could do for TV.  Themes focused on fear, bravery, hatred, cowardice, heroism, pain and randomness of death.  Filthiness of being on the front lines without baths, crawling in mud, wading through streams with gear, protecting their buddies, killing with their bayonets and endless but deadly patrols.  As in real life, replacement soldiers were grocery clerks, dancers, used car salesmen, baseball players or worked on telephone lines.

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Induction. Source unknown.

One possible reason the show was able to convey the feelings of the everyday Joe so well was that all of these six regulars had served in the military, some during WWII itself.  “Kirby” and “Little John” served in the US Navy while “Hanley” served in the Army Air Corps (before it broke off from the US Army and became the US Air Force) during WWII.  “Caje” also served as a drill sergeant during WWII in Canada in an air training corps.  “Saunders” served in the US Navy in 1947.  It is unknown if any of them were subjected to combat.

Another bit of uniqueness was not only its early-for-its-time human interest story line but its script.  There really weren’t many spoken lines except for when it counted; just a lot of Army-based jargon otherwise but well researched.  But one funny bit of trivia at this time: one of the most oft said lines was, “Shut up, Kirby.”

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According to various articles, the men totally enjoyed “playing soldier” and getting paid for it. Here, they are actually crossing a stream.

Also adding to its TV land “realism” was that all chatter was in German between Nazi soldiers or in French between the local townspeople; there was no translation or sub-titling.  The Nazi uniforms were so well replicated by the costume folks that some Jews working at MGM’s cafeteria were upset when actors came in from the set wearing very authentic-looking Nazi uniforms (No political statement being made; just fact.)

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A scene from Episode One with “green” Hanley and combat-hardened Saunders on board a transport heading to Omaha Beach on D-Day. Note the chalk denoting “PA 142” on Hanley’s helmet (still a sergeant). They were so marked to indicate which craft the soldier was to board upon “going over the side”.

Its first episode aired on October 2, 1962, set in England a day before D-Day.  In this initial episode, both Saunders and Hanley were sergeants.  By the second episode, Hanley had gotten a battlefield promotion to lieutenant and issued his Garand M-1 Carbine.  Saunders will be issued his trademark Thompson .45 caliber machine gun.  There is a very interesting history behind who got what weapon.  Both of their helmets will change for the subsequent episodes and will become identified with them for the entire series.

Hollywood stars clamoring for guest star roles, filming schedules and behind the scenes trivia to come in Part 2.

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As with all real GI Joes in WWII, the trademark Lucky Strikes… filterless.

 

 

A Soul Lost From WWII Comes Home – Epilogue


Fortune in War

I believe there is fortune in war.

Before Pearl Harbor, the US was still not recovered from the Great Depression.  With the money printed in great quantity – as a necessity – by the US government, the US war machine rolled into action.  Many executives and businessmen taking part in this frantic and mass expenditure of government money with their companies gained their financial fortunes from this great war as did a large number of Congressmen.

The boots on the ground also had fortune – but it was MISfortune.  Misfortune fell upon the millions of brave young men who were sent to war because world leaders had their own agendas.  Millions were killed like my dad’s favorite brother, my Uncle Suetaro.

Misfortune, unfortunately, also followed home for the rest of their lives those young men who survived combat.   Men like Smitty, Old Man Jack and Mr. Johnson.  Horrible nightmares each and every night.  Some succumbed to the immense weight this horrible misfortune had on their minds and ended their own lives after making it home.  Sadly, they are all being forgotten in our children’s history books.

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Our little group was afforded a day of sightseeing before leaving for Osaka/Kansai Airport in Japan, once again led by Mr. Yusuke Ota.  Here’s a small collection of sights taken in, some during the week (Clicking on an image will show you its location.):

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Mr. Kagimoto hunts for dragonflies at the  golf course we had lunch at. The facility was once for US Army officers.
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Shoeless children help their elder sell pineapples at bayside in Tacloban City.
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Meeting with beautiful wife of Tacloban City’s Mayor, Christina Gonzales, a former actress. Thank goodness for our Carmela in the center: she speaks four languages fluently including Tagalog, English and Japanese.
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Villaba’s town center; the beach is off immediately to the left. Our two vans are at the right.
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(From left) Masako, Christina Gonzales and Carmela. The other young lady in red in the background is another Filipina actress.

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Mr. Ota inspects a clock tower he donated to Tacloban City; he serves as a councilman in Fukuyama City where my uncle’s regimental army base was located during the war.

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School boys at Old Kawayan City, Leyte.
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At Albuera, Leyte. One of two self-destroyed Japanese howitzers can be seen behind Izumi.
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Hard life of a Filipino fisherman.
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At the San Juanico Bridge, the longest bridge in the Philippines. Engineering was provided by the Japanese.

While waiting at the Manila Airport for our connecting flight to Osaka, Mr. Ota took us to the Philippine Air Force Museum where among other items was the Type 99 Arisaka rifle Lt. Onoda kept with him for over 29 years in the Philippine jungle.  He was the last holdout from WWII:

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Epilogue

A Victory Nonetheless

Seventy years after this most brutal war in the Pacific, the same US Marines and the same Japanese military that sought to kill each other with extreme bitterness are now the closest of allies as shown in the USMC photos below.  Now, they sail together on the same US Navy ships, eat together, train together and assault the beaches here at Camp Pendleton, CA together in joint training exercises.  The same with the US Army.  My gut feeling is one of these gallant young men would die to protect the other if the unfortunate circumstances arose.

Then:

U.S. Marines inspect the bodies of three Japanese soldiers killed in the invasion at Peleliu island at the Palau group, September 16, 1944. (AP Photo/Joe Rosenthal)
Bitter enemies then, U.S. Marines inspect the bodies of three Japanese soldiers killed in the invasion at Peleliu island at the Palau group, September 16, 1944. (AP Photo/Joe Rosenthal)

Today:

110215-M-0564A-030 U.S. Marines and Japanese soldiers carry gear during a hike at Camp Pendleton, Calif., on Feb. 15, 2011. DoD photo by Lance Cpl. Gene Allen Ainsworth III, U.S. Marine Corps. (Released)
U.S. Marines and Japanese soldiers carry gear during a hike at Camp Pendleton, Calif., on Feb. 15, 2011. (Three US Marines on the left, two Japanese Self-Defense Forces soldiers on the right.)  DoD photo by Lance Cpl. Gene Allen Ainsworth III, U.S. Marine Corps. (Released)

Uncle Suetaro lost his life and while Smitty carried the war silently for the rest of his life, they were both victorious because of the above.

It was not in vain.

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One War.  Two Countries.  One Family.

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Uncle Yutaka, taken at the Minidoka, ID “War Relocation Center”, circa 1944. You can see the sub-standard wooden barracks they lived in; they only had tar paper covering the wood slat walls. Yutaka was the oldest surviving sibling but was imprisoned here during the war. My dad and cousins were also here but no picture of them is available.
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Aunt Shiz and my cousins as they leave the Tule Lake, CA “War Relocation Center”, November 1945. My best guess is she still doesn’t know for certain that her younger brother Suetaro had been taken by the Japanese Imperial Army and killed. The atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima where her mother Kono and older sister Michie (and her children that went on the pilgrimage) lived just three months earlier.
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Dad in his US 8th Army uniform along with Namie (center) who went on the pilgrimage and Sadako, her older sister. Dad had taken them Spam and C-rations plus clothing he bought at the PX in Tokyo.  April 1948, Miyajima, Japan.
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Uncle Suetaro’s official death certificate from the remnants of the Japanese military. It was dated October 15, 1947, less than two months before my dad arrived as a US Army sergeant for the Occupation of Japan.

My Thoughts of the Experience

I cannot speak for Masako or my other cousins but what you believe in is almighty.  Hope.  Fear.  Happiness.  Sadness.  I experienced all those during the pilgrimage to Leyte.

While listening to Masako’s tender letter to Uncle Suetaro, a feeling of deep regrets and the dashing of hope experienced by Grandmother Kono buried me.  My heart could see Grandmother’s face in silent torment, resting in Masako’s arms in 1954 as she drew her last breath in the Kanemoto family home.

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Grandma Kono at her Seattle barbershop, circa 1917. A forlorn Grandma and Masako, sometime after learning of Suetaro’s death, circa 1948. Grandma would pass away in this very home six years later.

Just like most American mothers, Grandmother must have clung on to a hope – however dim – that her youngest son Suetaro would come home… the one she decided to keep from returning to Seattle in 1940 so that he could carry on the Kanemoto name and inherit the home and land. That was not to be now. It would have been better to have let him go home. Her son would be alive.

But perhaps Uncle Suetaro would have ended up in the same prison camps that my dad, aunts and uncles were in but would still be alive.  Or, he would have answered the call out of camp and volunteered for the US Army as thousands of other Nisei’s did to prove their loyalty, only to die in Italy or France as part of the 442nd Regimental Combat Team during WWII.¹

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Uncle Suetaro and my dad.

I also thought about my dad often during the trek.  At 96 years of age, this journey would have been physically impossible for him.  More so, I wondered if the stirring up of fond memories of his youngest brother would do more harm than good at this stage in his life.

My 24 year old son bows deeply in front of the family crypt holding the ashes of Suetaro who was killed at 24 years of age.
In 2012, my then 24 year old son bows deeply in front of the family crypt holding Uncle Suetaro’s fingernail clippings and a lock of hair.  Uncle Suetaro was killed also at 24 years of age.

I also felt more deeply the quandary confronting Uncle Suetaro when he was drafted into the Japanese Imperial Army.  The decision he had to make to knowingly fight the country your siblings were living in as Americans… and the country he most dearly wanted to return to.  However, he wrote in his farewell letter that he will fight to free his older siblings from the prisons FDR sent them to.

Also in his heart and in that of his mother, both knew this was a one-way trip.  A death sentence.  Japanese soldiers rarely returned from war.  In the case of his IJA’s 41st Regiment, only 20 young men returned home out of 2,550.

I’m sure just like any other American boy, he wanted a life that was worth living, a life filled with feelings, emotions, love and dreams.  That would never happen and it pains me without end.

Before he met his death, was he drowned in futility or solace?  Did he see death up close and come to the stark realization that would be his future perhaps tomorrow?  What did he dream about as he took his last breaths or was he blindly looking up at the stars hoping?  Was he dreaming about his childhood, playing on the corner of King and Maynard in Seattle with my dad?  Was he in great pain or was his death swift and without warning?  Did he see the eyes of the American soldier inches from his own eyes in a hand-to-hand combat to the death?  Was he hungry?  How terrified was he?

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A tiny photo of the two brothers, dad and Suetaro, in Hiroshima, perhaps 1928. It fell out from behind one of the pictures in Uncle Suetaro’s photo album, filled with pictures Uncle Yutaka likely mailed to him from Seattle. Although tiny, it must have been precious to Uncle Suetaro for him to have kept it. I wish I knew why.

The painful mystery of what Uncle Suetaro did, felt or saw in his last days will remain forever so…  That is one agony that will be with me until my own time comes.  Happily, we at least visited him in his unmarked graveyard among the now lusciously green vegetation with the birds endlessly singing Taps for him.

As Izumi passionately said to Uncle Suetaro’s spirit, “Come home with us.”

Indeed, he did.

He is no longer a soul lost in a faraway jungle.

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I wish to thank my Hiroshima cousins for making this unforgettable pilgrimage possible and a special thank you to Izumi whose untiring efforts to follow up on Japan-based leads brought comfort to our family.   I also wish to express my sincere gratitude to Akehira and Carmela who made dear Masako’s journey so comfortable and worry-free.  And a heartfelt thank you to Mr. Yusuke Ota whose in-depth knowledge allowed us to see our Uncle Suetaro’s last footsteps on this earth and gave Masako peace in her soul.

Most of all, Uncle, thank you for your sacrifice.  Indeed, you set your older brothers and sister free.

Rest in peace.

南無阿弥陀仏

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Other chapters are here for ease of locating earlier posts in this series:

A Soul Lost From WWII Comes Home – Part 1

A Soul Lost From WWII Comes Home – Part 2

A Soul Lost From WWII Comes Home – Part 3

A Soul Lost From WWII Comes Home – Part 4

A Soul Lost From WWII Comes Home – Part 5

A Soul Lost From WWII Comes Home – Part 6

A Soul Lost From WWII Comes Home – Part 7

A Soul Lost from WWII Comes Home – Part 8

Notes

  1.  For a summary of the all Nisei US army regiment during WWII: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/442nd_Infantry_Regiment_%28United_States%29