All posts by Mustang.Koji

I have found that "family" around you is a product of twists of fate, world events and personal decisions made long ago. Anguish, happiness, despair and harmony. The effect of war on families and the resulting peace from the untold sacrifices made by the Greatest Generation. While I am not a writer, I hope to be able to bring to light the spontaneity of life. As I wish to be historically accurate, some quotes will be as I heard them...but there was no malice coming from those that spoke those words. They were reliving the past horrors of war - a war that you nor I fought in. They did.

“There’s No Toilet Paper in the Jungle of Burma” | Masako and Spam Musubi


Dad 1920
Dad at left, 1920. Seattle, WA.

https://p47koji.com/2012/06/03/theres-no-toilet-paper-in-the-jungle-of-burma/

At 99 years of age, Dad quietly passed away yesterday – Good Friday.

While of course sad, I am happy he had a full life as he loved to eat; that was what he loved to do in his last days.  He passed away contently, just about half an hour after he had a good lunch.  We took him his favorite Japanese sweets – odango – just a few weeks ago and for that, we are happy.

Our America Divided


I wrote this about four years ago, I think… and it is not re-blogged to change anyone’s mind on a topic, especially if you eat soap pods. More so, it is re-blogged to let others know they are not alone in how they feel. Remember, this was written about four years ago.

Masako and Spam Musubi

America Divided My feeble attempt to express my opinion…

Our United States has become less of a nation.

It is more than just split in half.  A nation cannot survive split in two.

Think of our country being not much more than local drug gangs fighting for their drug turf.

Their own street corner in their perceived territories.

Each gang with their own beliefs, their own mini-economies, their own cultures and in-fighting for control.

And killing those who invade their boundaries.

One gang is right.  The other gangs are wrong.

And they choose to ignore their neighborhood if not hold them hostage.

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To me, our nation no longer has collective major goals.

Heck, we Americans now may actually have less commonage with other Americans than ever before.

In my opinion, segregation by race fueled the beginning of disunion.

No.  I don’t condone segregation.  Of course not.  However, since the intense focus…

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The Magic of Churchill’s Speeches


I just watched the movie “Churchill”; it’s a fine piece theatrically… But unlike Star Trek which is clearly pure fiction, “Churchill” shows the hideous, subliminal mindset of Hollywood, using free license and its influence in another sad attempt to re-write history.

In it, it presents Churchill adamantly opposed to D-Day when in fact, he used his power to support it. There was some truth in it, sure: Churchill did love his cigars (like me), wished to sail with the invasion fleet into harm’s way on D-Day but did not only on the orders of his King and his bouts with depression… but it reminded me of his wonderful speeches of which I wrote about a few years back.

Masako and Spam Musubi

churchill Sir Winston Churchill and his cigar. From http://www.express.co.uk/news/

While avoiding any political endorsement of Prime Minister Winston Churchill, he did lead England to victory over Hitler’s Germany during World War II.

It was a grave time for England¹.  While I am certainly not a military historian, his famous speeches – with his distinctive speech and delivery which helped keep the British morale bolstered  – always intrigued me.  They were always stirring.  Why is that, I thought.

As an example, an excerpt of one of his more famous WWII speeches follows, broadcast to the free world at the end of the Battle of Britain¹.  He pays homage to the brave, young RAF pilots who flew countless of sorties in defense of their homeland against numerically superior Nazi warplanes.  The radio broadcast recording is set to start moments before his famous words of Never in the field of human conflict…

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Old Man Jack-ism #9


Masako and Spam Musubi

flag-10 My supercharged Grabber Orange Mustang lived outside 24/7 for her first five years. Old Man Jack’s driveway is to the very left; he would on occasion call me over to his garage to chat.

I was out front one morning, enjoying a gorgeous holiday weekend.  While pointing in my general direction, Old Man Jack said to me from across the street, “Koji, she needs to come in at night.”  My car was in between Jack and me.  He loved my car…almost as much as his F4U Corsair.

Why would he tell me to put my Grabber Orange Mustang into the garage?  He knows it’s parked outside 24/7 because the aggravating ex took away my garage without saying a word beforehand.

“Say what, Jack?” asked I…

I was humbled shortly thereafter by this exceptional and aging WWII combat vet who went to war as a young boy.

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Indeed, I…

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The Other Pearl Harbor Story – Kimmel and Short


GPCox’s post on how political leaders’ personal agendas lead us into war and then onto political coverups compliments my series on FDR, Pearl Harbor and broken secret codes. https://p47koji.com/2014/03/30/what-did-fdr-know-part-1/

Pacific Paratrooper

ph911-4

People around the nation, including some vocal congressmen, asked why America had been caught off guard at Pearl Harbor.

President Franklin D. Roosevelt said he would appoint an investigatory commission. Supreme Court Justice Owen Roberts — a pro-British internationalist friendly with FDR — was selected to head it. Also appointed to the group: Major General Frank McCoy, General George Marshall’s close friend for 30 years; Brigadier General Joseph McNarney, who was on Marshall’s staff and chosen on his recommendation; retired Rear Admiral Joseph Reeves, whom FDR had given a job in lend-lease; and Admiral William Standley, a former fleet commander. Only the last seemed to have no obvious fraternity with the Washington set.

The commission conducted only two to three days of hearings in Washington. Admiral Standley, arriving late, was startled by the inquiry’s chummy atmosphere. Admiral Harold Stark and General Marshall were asked no difficult or embarrassing questions. Furthermore…

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